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pk10滚雪球八码分配图

时间: 2019年11月17日 11:41 阅读:57644

pk10滚雪球八码分配图

� � What I did nextwhich seems totally out of character for meonly compounded the problem tenfold. pk10滚雪球八码分配图  We don't pretend to have invented the idea of a strong corporate culture, and we've been aware of a lotof the others that have come before us. In the early days of IBM, some of the things Tom Watson didwith his slogans and group activities weren't all that different from the things we do. And, as I've said,we've certainly borrowed every good idea we've come across. Helen and I picked up several ideas on atrip we took to Korea and Japan in 1975. A lot of the things they do over there are very easy to apply todoing business over here. Culturally, things seem so differentlike sitting on the floor eating eels andsnailsbut people are people, and what motivates one group generally will motivate another. And our success, it turned out, had attracted a lot of attention. My landlord, the department storeowner, was so impressed with our Ben Franklin's success that he decided not to renew our leaseat anypriceknowing full well that we had nowhere else in town to move the store. He did offer to buy thefranchise, fixtures, and inventory at a fair price; he wanted to give the store to his son. I had no alternativebut to give it up. But I sold the Eagle Store lease toSterlingso that John Dunham, my worthy competitorand mentor, could finally have that expansion he'd wanted. � � � Small-town merchants, by the way, aren't the only groups we've gotten into controversies with bysticking to our philosophy of putting the customer ahead of everything else. On the surface, the idea ofserving the customer sounds so simple, so logical, and so obvious. But from the very beginning, the waywe have practiced it has been so radical that it has frequently gotten us into trouble with what folks call"the system." In the early days, the department stores put a lot of pressure on vendors to keep them fromselling to discounters like us because they hated what we were doing: offering our customers prices muchlower than theirs. In some states, the department stores used so-called "fair trade" laws to try and blockdiscounters from doing business at all. The first use I made of the leisure which I gained by disconnecting myself from the Review, was to finish the Logic. In July and August, 1838, I had found an interval in which to execute what was still undone of the original draft of the Third Book. In working out the logical theory of those laws of nature which are not laws of Causation, nor corollaries from such laws, I was led to recognize kinds as realities in nature, and not mere distinctions for convenience; a light which I had not obtained when the First Book was written, and which made it necessary for me to modify and enlarge several chapters of that Book. The Book on Language and Classification, and the chapter on the Classification of Fallacies, were drafted in the autumn of the same year; the remainder of the work, in the summer and autumn of 1840. From April following to the end of 1841, my spare time was devoted to a complete rewriting of the book from its commencement. It is in this way that all my books have been composed. They were always written at least twice over; a first draft of the entire work was completed to the very end of the subject, then the whole begun again de novo; but incorporating, in the second writing, all sentences and parts of sentences of the old draft, which appeared as suitable to my purpose as anything which I could write in lieu of them. I have found great advantages in this system of double redaction. It combines, better than any other mode of composition, the freshness and vigour of the first conception, with the superior precision and completeness resulting from prolonged thought. In my own case, moreover, I have found that the patience necessary for a careful elaboration of the details of composition and expression, costs much less effort after the entire subject has been once gone through, and the substance of all that I find to say has in some manner, however imperfect, been got upon paper. The only thing which I am careful, in the first draft, to make as perfect as I am able, is the arrangement. If that is bad, the whole thread on which the ideas string themselves becomes twisted; thoughts placed in a wrong connexion are not expounded in a manner that suits the right, and a first draft with this original vice is next to useless as a foundation for the final treatment. � �  �